Archives for Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week

Runway

Valentino Couture Spring 2017

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Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017 Valentino Couture Spring 2017Valentino Couture Spring 2017. Images & Source Via WWD

One could argue that this couture season saw two major debuts, the more obvious, that of Dior’s Maria Grazia Chiuri. In a sense, her former partner, Pierpaolo Piccioli, had his own debut, his first solo couture collection for Valentino, since he and Chiuri ascended to the role of joint creative directors after the retirement of the house founder.

“To do couture for a designer is a great opportunity,” Piccioli said during a preview, appearing not at all frazzled on the eve of his third show in three weeks. (He’s shown men’s last week in Paris, and prior to that, pre-fall, in New York.) “For me to create couture, to have the opportunity to work with the atelier, is a dream come true.”

For spring, Piccioli staged another exquisite Valentino Dream sequence. What did surprise: The challenging nature of the collection. These were not easy clothes. Exquisite, yes, but not easy in terms of proportion. Dresses fell free-form to the floor from a high neck or off the shoulders, unfettered by demarcations of waist or hips. Often, subtle trapeze cuts, pleats and vertical ruffles added sly volume to the gentle plissés and chiffons. The overall look was surrealist, otherworldly nightgown; these beauties could have costumed Heaven in a Cocteau film, had he been a minimalist. There were day looks as well, including a round-shouldered cape and a long white coat embroidered discreetly with classical symbols of love and nature, both in sturdy, austere cashmere double-face.

street style

{street style} Out & About in Paris

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Via Vogue Paris & WWD
 
The couture runway might be fashion’s grandest stage, but some showgoers are keeping things interesting on the Paris streets this week.
Runway

Valentino Couture Spring 2016

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Valentino Couture Spring 2016 Images Via WWD

Speaking to Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli is always like hearing an Italian art history lesson in stereo. In one ear, she is talking about Mariano Fortuny, his Delphos dress, and “aged” velvet, and in the other, he’s speaking about Isadora Duncan and Loie Fuller and their “expressionist dancing.” All of this exotic early-20th-century Venetian-pagan romanticism was sewn lightly into the Valentino Haute Couture collection and trailed around by barefoot nymphs with gold metal serpents writhing in their tendriled tresses. Via Vogue

Runway

Chanel Couture Spring 2016

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Chanel Couture Spring 2016 Images Via WWD & Instyle.com

Karl Lagerfeld hit the fashion trifecta at his Chanel Haute Couture spring 2016 show, recruiting the famous faces of today’s It girls—Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, and Bella Hadid—to complete his line-up of models. Jenner was the first of the squad to march along the zen-like, eco-inspired garden set in the Grand Palais. The model was clad in a sweeping black lace creation that boasted a plunging neckline and embroidery running down the front of the dress, along the bodice, and straps.

Runway

Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014

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Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-2 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-3 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-4 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-5 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-6 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-7 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-8 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-9 Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014-10Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014 Source & Images Via WWD.com & Style.com

Ulyana Sergeenko Couture Fall 2014: Ulyana Sergeenko looked back to Russia’s revolutionary period, setting out to translate the political and creative turmoil into a lineup that oscillated between USSR-inspired rigidness and the folly of a Tamara de Lempicka painting. In every couture collection, Ulyana Sergeenko tells a story. This time, it was a reimagining of a ride on the Orient Express. Sergeenko’s new heroine not only crossed borders (the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan), but also, in a manner of speaking, cross-dressed, borrowing clothes from the men she met on her travels and mixing them with her own more feminine attire. “She could be a movie star,” Sergeenko said, “but she’s definitely a femme fatale.”

Sergeenko opened with a strict coat in black leather with worn-out effects, and quickly followed it up with a pair of luscious high-waisted pants, styled with a transparent top and a long, trailing boa. More literal references to the art movements of the era included colorful, hand-knitted mohair sweaters, an homage to Lempicka, as well as the more abstract, geometric lines of Kazimir Malevich.

At a preview a couple of days before the show, Sergeenko was keen to point out the hand-painted beaded fringe suspended from the back of a silk chemisier gown, or the way the stripes on a sheath weren’t a print but rather intarsias of narrow bands of silk. It was impressive stuff in close-up, as were the hand-embroidered cotton buds (a nod to Kazakhstan’s major crop) that decorated many of the looks.

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