Archives for Paris Fashion Week

Runway

Chanel RTW Fall 2016

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Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Chanel RTW Fall 2016
Chanel RTW Fall 2016 Source & Images Via WWD

“The pearls are too modest.” Lagerfeld’s deft manipulation of the house codes — “things like this” — to suit his mood du jour is nothing short of remarkable. For fall, he worked a particular alchemy, amping up the signature regalia — pearls, boaters, camellias in the interests of chic modernity.

There were suits galore, the dominant silhouette lean and to the knee, with skirts zipped up the sides, or unzipped to reveal contrasting tweed linings. These came in countless variations, and looked newest in vibrant pinks and berries. A sportswear attitude surfaced in sweaters decorated with grommets over metallic skirts, and a shrunken jean jacket over camellia-print pants. As for practicality, Chanel trenchcoat, anyone? And, yes, Choupette, her portrait turned into the stuff of skirts and big, functional totes. For the ingenue with a party to go to, Lagerfeld offered angelic white tiers in short and long versions over black tights. And there were the extras — hats held in place with chinstraps fastened with big jewelry buckles; long, thick knitted gloves; emoji pins; iPhone breast pockets, and those pearls galore — all piled on in glorious excess.

Done as it was, it radiated tony practicality and Lagerfeld-style, so much so that it brought to mind that “w” concept — wardrobe dressing, but with focus and high style. Asked whether he’d considered that approach, Lagerfeld said, “I’m very down-to-earth.”

Runway

Valentino RTW Fall 2016

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Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016 Valentino RTW Fall 2016
Valentino RTW Fall 2016. Source & Images Via WWD

Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli’s stunningly graceful fall collection for Valentino gave us more of their fashion philosophy, drawing on the “Happening” performance art movement of the Fifties and Sixties and the value it placed on viewer participation and the concept of the ephemeral, as well as further exploration of the dance motifs tested in the spring couture collection.

The tony street-goth tone of the tailored navy and black double-breasted coats over matching ribbed-knit turtlenecks, ankle-length tulle skirts and combat boots that opened the show came as surprise — a great one. Dancers off-duty came in moody layers of mannish outerwear over long skirts, and modernist jersey dresses with spaghetti straps that laced in back over collar bone-framing ballerina shirts, as Chiuri and Piccioli intuited the styles of Karole Armitage and Martha Graham into gorgeous day- and eveningwear. There were moments of austerity, dark and sober in a plain black tutu dress over a black turtleneck and leggings; and light and fluid in earthy, draped jersey dresses that fell in soft, clingy pleats around the body. And there were notes of romantic decoration, via graphic triangle and circle embroideries and prints that referenced costumes from the Ballets Russes.

The variety was amazing. A gold velvet dress with a flounced top and a long ribbon belt wrapped around the waist worn over a blush turtleneck exuded the charming shyness of an understudy. A silver-fringed sweater and gold-fringed skirt had the seasoned glamour of a ballet master. There were bad-girl black swans in tulle, leather and witchy gold-star embroideries, and ingenues in the breathless finale of transparent, tea-stained tulle dresses decorated with fluttered ruffles, a sweetheart-shaped bodice and twinkly stardust.

Runway

Dior RTW Fall 2016

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Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016 Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016 Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016 Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016 Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016 Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016 Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016 Christian Dior RTW Fall 2016
Dior RTW Fall 2016. Source & Images Via WWD

Raf Simons has left the building and there’s a collection to be done. What to do? Start with — surprise! — the B’s: basic black and a Bar jacket. That was the approach taken by studio directors Serge Ruffieux and Lucie Meier for their Dior show on Friday. The result was a lineup of attractive, often alluring clothes. The kind of clothes that, at another moment, might have comprised the commercial counterpart to a more experimental runway show.

Meier and Ruffieux did a good job. They worked with a lean silhouette, sensual but not vulgar. Their emphasis on black began with sturdy fabrics and featured well-placed details — a wide, self-fabric X buttoned onto a short coat; a V-shaped ruffle front of a knit top-and skirt look.

The designers integrated color and considerable decorative flourish, always controlled and usually in the manner of Simons, whose major contribution at Dior was the imposition of his modernist aesthetic on the house codes. This fusion continued in the way a fluid printed dress or camel cashmere coat draped at the neck, in fabric mixes does — a hint of print from under a short, side-slit skirt, and some bold, unfussy embroideries. Evening offered some lovely looks that bared one or both shoulders with a hint of exotica.

Runway

Chloé RTW Fall 2016

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ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016 ChloŽ RTW Fall 2016
Chloé RTW Fall 2016. Images & Source WWD.com

“She had this incredibly inspiring attitude, her sense of daring,” Waight Keller said backstage before her show on Thursday morning. “She was chic and boyish at the same time. I found something really charismatic about her.”

Not to mention plenty of fodder with which to rev up Chloé’s range while retaining the lovely boho bread-and-butter that Waight Keller delivers consistently and well. Anytime, anywhere, girl-bike-bravado adds up to a toughened-up attitude and an infusion of leather, and Waight Keller took a carpe diem approach. Leather with flou? It worked like a charm in any number of lovely blouses with poetic collars and sleeves that wafted atop various takes on the biker pants. She went more broadly sportif with popover shearlings and knits as well as a major poncho motif. No matter that giant squares of thick fabric flapping about the ankles might be counterintuitive to two-wheel travel; this is fashion, not a dirt road. The ponchos checked the Seventies and nomadic boxes, looking good along the way.

For all her boyish musings, Waight Keller never lost sight of who her girl is, and that she loves a pretty, fluid dress. Here, they came in collages of diaphanous fabrics in dusty shades worn over biker boots. Cut in challenging, out-to-there volumes, they made sartorial adventure of the pretty sort.

Runway

Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015

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Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-9 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-8 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-7 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-6 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-5 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-4 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-3 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-2 Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015-1
Louis Vuitton RTW Spring 2015 Images & Source WWD

“A beginning is a very delicate time,” delivered a Greek chorus of giant, attractive young faces that were projected onto glass screens at the start of the Louis Vuitton show. Their scale and sci-fi intonation continued the otherworldly aura of the Frank Gehry-designed Fondation Louis Vuitton, which has its official opening later this month. The vast, multi angle, multi winged spaceship of a building looks inviting and imposing.

That juxtaposition — or was it a fusion? — of techno cool with the warm, nostalgic familiar presaged Nicolas Ghesquière’s second collection for Vuitton. Backstage before the event, the designer said he considered it an honor to show in the space but that he didn’t create the collection specifically to work within it. “Of course, I was projecting my work into the environment,” he said. “But it was not a direct reference to the space. It’s only been six months. I’m building that wardrobe, and I’m defining what is Louis Vuitton today, thinking about different moments for the multiple women I’m projecting for Louis Vuitton. But again, it’s, like, March. Not a big statement.”

He undersold. This collection was a huge step from fall’s pleasant transitional effort. That said, Ghesquière did, indeed, continue with the wardrobe-building template he established then. Here, he did it with greater range and flamboyance, even a dose of humor. He opened with beautiful, intricately wrought multi textured crochet and lace dresses, some played against slick geometrically patterned eel. These went two ways: clean and precise or fluid and girly. Yet Ghesquière has always been a pants guy. His most elegant looks were a pair of jackets over shaggy fur liners and shorts. Though ergonomic knee-pad detailing harkened back to Ghesquière’s past life in futuristic sci-fi fashion, he preferred to linger elsewhere. “Sure, there’s a hint of the Seventies,” he said. And not always the chicest hint — crushed velvet jeans, anyone?

Bags
— what do you think? — were shown in numerous shapes and treatments, including a feisty red-on-black update of the monogram.

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